Presidential Race

Armstrong Williams: 2016 candidates must earn black voters' support

Armstrong Williams: 2016 candidates must earn black voters' support

WASHINGTON (Sinclair Broadcast Group) — Following controversy over his comments at the National Action Network convention, Armstrong Williams told WBFF Thursday that he found it "offensive" that so many other speakers at the event focused on racism instead of other issues that impact black communities...

The Reasons Behind Trump's Rise

The Reasons Behind Trump's Rise

Donald Trump's understanding of political campaigning as "essentially a marketing problem," the phrase David Reid used in his 1988 article, "Marketing the Political Product," is often overlooked.

God Morning

Every state Hillary Clinton and the Democratic machine has won (especially across the South) has been because of the strong support from minorities. That is without a doubt Donald Trump's achilles heal. The Donald needs to shore that up sooner rather than later. It will clearly become the difference in victory and defeat in November.

Why?

Clinton's strongest base (firewall) against sanders and in a general will be the minority vote. Trump will assuredly need to pick a VP who has the ability to attract minority voters in order to build a diverse coalitions that is necessary to win. 

God Morning

 

What was the catalyst for the outsiders phenomenon that is sweeping the Trump rallies and Bernie Sanders again closing in on establishment candidate Hillary Clinton?

It may not look like it from the outside, since ultimately Obama was elected and has since become the consummate insider, but the Democratic Party is just as much a victim of the outsider phenomenon as the Republican Party.  Once the cat was let out of the bag with the selections of Palin and Obama, the parties’ establishment wings have found it next to impossible to control the outsider sentiment within their ranks.  A lot of ink has been spilled over this issue of ‘voter anger’ as a driving force behind this phenomenon.  Staring into the eye great recession, in the wake of a decade-long war in the middle-east, and amidst a burgeoning national debt, sky high oil prices and crippling unemployment, such anger was palpable and visceral.

               But that only tells half the story. Americans vented their frustration in a sense by electing President Obama, not once, but twice.  Europe went so far as to crown Obama as the prince of peace before he even had a chance to end any war.  The recession abated over time as they usually do – and whether Obama’s seamanship or the arrival of fairer winds is to blame for the turn in our nation’s fortunes – surely the country is now on a far better track  than it was eight years ago.   And yet the anger persists.  It is evident in the crowds that appear at political rallies, and in the strident tone of the candidates. Not one of them pledges to maintain the current course.  All of them believe the country is still way off course, although for different reasons.  The voter anger of today is harder to place, more deeply entrenched in the national psyche.  None of the candidates have been able to coin a term for it, and yet it is recognized, like the gravitational pull of a black hole, by its’ effect on the matter surrounding it.  In the political universe the equivalent of matter is the party establishment.

               In this election the issues are merely a canvas for a deeper seated malaise.  Of course people would like to have a more secure border, a less volatile global environment, more employment opportunities and more prosperity here at home.  But it goes deeper than that.  There is a sense of polarity among the electorate characterized by significant pluralities at the extremes. The middle is shrinking, both economically and politically.  

Ben Carson’s endorsement: He says there are ‘two different’ Trumps, one of them more ‘cerebral’

Ben Carson’s endorsement: He says there are ‘two different’ Trumps, one of them more ‘cerebral’

PALM BEACH, Fla. – Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson endorsed Donald Trump on Friday, throwing his support to the GOP front-runner in a 45-minute joint appearance where Trump said he doesn’t see a need for any more televised debates.

God Morning

Dr. Carson has not placed among the top three in any of the primaries thus far, and even though his supporters are asking him to stay in the race, he will have to face the harsh reality sooner rather than later. Republican primary voters are favoring an angry, aggressive candidate as Donald Trump’s landslide victory in South Carolina seems to indicate. It goes almost without saying that Trumps’ and Carson’s styles could not be any more diametrically opposed.  If voters want an angry candidate, they are not going to get it from Carson, whose demeanor is unswervingly cool and deliberative.

            Still there is some room to maneuver for Carson.  Whether he can add value as someone who reduces competition for Trump, or increases the viability of the Rubio campaign remains to be seen.  At first glance it would seem that Rubio, both because of his Florida base (which he shared with Jeb Bush) and his establishment credentials, will inherit establishment votes conceded by Bush in his exit from the race.  The competition for second place is where the race is at right now.  Cruz needs every vote he can get – and that places Carson in a prime negotiating position.  On the other hand, the Trump campaign is clearly worried about a surging Rubio after his campaign finished unexpectedly strong in the three primary contests thus far.  The Trump campaign may see Carson’s exit from the race as an opportunity to boost Cruz and hamstring Rubio’s momentum.

Those who know, respect,  and love Dr. Carson all want the best for him.  When it’s all said and done, no matter how it turns out, Dr. Carson will have established a new model for an outsider candidate in Republican Presidential politics.  He continues to build on a groundswell of goodwill and popularity all over the country that is sure to carry over into anything he decides to do next.